Commemorating the Life and Work of Flannery O’Connor at the College of Charleston

Please join members of the English Department at the College of Charleston for an evening of art and music commemorating the life and work of Flannery O’Connor!

Date: Thursday, October 2, 2014

Place: Towell Library at the Cistern

Time: 6:30 – 8:00 PM

Acoustic Music by The Harrows (Hazel Ketchum and Bob Culver) on themes pertaining to sin and salvation.

Harrows

To hear a sample of the music, click on http://www.reverbnation.com/theharrows

In addition:

Cut paper collages by Lillian Trettin from the series “Southern Gothic in Color”

Surprise contributions from College of Charleston students

In preparation, here is a puzzle for readers of Flannery O’Connor’s fiction:

O'Connor riddleThis image (the first in a series of cut paper collages) pertains to one of O’Connor’s short stories.  Technically speaking, it is not an illustration but a visual response to the text in question.  Which story? What is the significance of the image? The first person to email me at ltrettin@bellsouth.net with two correct answers will win an art-o-mat box. You must attend the event on October 2 to claim this prize.

See you there!

 

 

 

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About Lillian-Trettin

I grew up in the Appalachian "Bible Belt" of East Tennessee in the southern United States, listening to banjo music and gospel lyrics as well as the Beatles. As a kid, I was curious about religious rituals like speaking in tongues and snake handling but resistant to the fundamentalist thinking they involved. Flannery O'Connor's tales of religious fanatics, con men, bigots, and the spiritually bereft or ambivalent resonate for me. Despite having traveled widely and lived in other places, I am (as so many Southerners claim to be) permanently "South haunted." I returned to making art full time in 2011, following a career as a teacher, researcher, and consultant and after raising two sons. I’m convinced the delay enriched rather than impeded my growth as an artist.
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